Posted 3 months ago

April 13, 2014 | Sombrero Island, Batangas

Posted 3 months ago

Dreamchasers (at Ninoy Aquino International Airport (MNL) Terminal 3)

Posted 3 months ago

Sa banta ng takipsilim,

Posted 3 months ago

Owen Sanico at Planet Dive Resort.

April 12, 2014 | Mabini, Batangas

Posted 3 months ago

@isdaadmu’s students for today’s skin diving lessons. (at Sitio Balanoy Mabini, Batangas)

Posted 3 months ago

malacanan:

Radio broadcast message, as written by Captain Salvador P. Lopez, delivered by Third Lieutenant Normando Ildefonso “Norman” Reyes on the “Voice of Freedom” radio broadcast of April 9, 1942 from Malinta Tunnel, Corregidor

"We, too, shall rise. After we have paid the full price of our redemption, we shall return to show the scars of sacrifices that all may touch and believe. When the trumpets sound the hour we shall roll aside the stone before the tomb and the tyrant guards shall scatter in confusion. No wall of stone shall then be strong enough to contain us, no human force shall suffice to hold us in subjection, we shall rise in the name of freedom and the East shall be alight with the glory of our liberation.”

This broadcast, as read by Subas Herrero, originally appeared in Volume 1 of “20 Speeches that Moved a Nation” (Platypus Publishing, 2001).

Read the full transcript:
http://malacanang.gov.ph/1226-bataan-has-fallen/

Learn more about the 72nd anniversary of the fall of Bataan: http://www.gov.ph/araw-ng-kagitingan/

Posted 3 months ago

hollybailey:

It was one of the most searing images of the war in Iraq: a tiny girl, splattered in blood and screaming in horror after her parents had been shot and killed by American soldiers who fired on the family car when it failed to yield for a foot patrol in the northern town of Tel Afar.

Taken by Getty Images photographer Chris Hondros, who was embedded with the patrol, the January 2005 photo offered powerful visual testimony to the horrific impact of the conflict on Iraqi citizens. It came as the American public was beginning to question the rising death toll and purpose of a war that was starting to look unwinnable.

Hondros was inured to the chaos of war. By then, he was a veteran combat photographer who had served as a witness for the world on the frontlines of conflicts in far-away places like Afghanistan, Pakistan, Liberia and Sierra Leone. But Hondros wasn’t merely fueled by the adrenaline of covering war. He was there to document the impact of conflict on people, both soldiers and civilians, to discover something deeper about humanity through war.

“He tried to make sense of what was happening around him, to really understand the chaos that he often found himself in,” recalled Sandy Ciric, a longtime photo editor at Getty Images who was one of Hondros’s closest friends and colleagues. “He was a professional, and he knew it was his job to document. But he was also human. He was really affected by the people he met and the things he saw… He was always thinking and writing and shooting and working, trying to understand the terrible complexity of war and the impact it had on people.”

So it was a horrible and painful twist of fate that a photographer so determined to show the world the human impact of conflict died trying to do just that. Hondros was killed in a mortar attack along with fellow photojournalist Tim Hetherington in April 2011 while covering the war in Libya.

He left behind an adoring mother, a fiance and a tight-knit group of friends and colleagues who were devastated by his death but also determined to preserve his memory and legacy as one of the most promising photojournalists of a generation who died too soon.

It’s that career that is the subject of “Testament,” a new book of Hondros’s work published by Powerhouse Books and Getty Images (which is donating its portion of the proceeds to The Chris Hondros Fund). The book, edited by Ciric and Pancho Bernasconi of Getty Images and Christina Piaia, Hondros’s fiance, features not only images that Hondros took over more than a decade of covering conflict, but also his own words, taken from stories and essays he wrote about his experiences on the road as he sought to understand what he was seeing through his lens.

I previewed the new Chris Hondros Book, which is out today (via Yahoo News)

Posted 3 months ago
Posted 3 months ago

I’ll miss these sunsets.

Posted 3 months ago

One of the manu pocket deserts in Metro Manila. Just imagine how much better, and cooler, this metropolis would be if we turn all parking lots into parks.

#Urban #Design #Metro #Manila #Philippines #Parks #Cars #GatesOfHell (at SM Hypermarket)

Posted 3 months ago
urbanination:

Priorities. 

More design and lesser engineering please.

urbanination:

Priorities. 

More design and lesser engineering please.

(Source: owenfinn16)

Posted 4 months ago

May umuugong (at Ugong Barangay Hall)

Posted 4 months ago

Mactan to Manila

July 17, 2013

Posted 4 months ago

Sara

March 30, 2014 | Mabini, Batangas

Posted 4 months ago

Angel

We were in San Jose, Tarlac to for the Abelling Tribe’s Anito Festival. Rituals have been going on for a week in one house to transfer the Anito from an aging tribesman to a younger host. During this afternoon, the elders were chanting, dancing, and performing other rituals. But just right next the small crowd were kids running around, playing with their phones, and mocking the elders’ dances.

I saw this girl sitting in the same spot facing the wall. I sat behind her to wait for a good shot. While I was waiting, kids in the house started gathering behind me. They probably noticed that my camera was facing towards the sitting baby in front of us so they called her. For a few minutes they called, “Angel, Angel.”, but still she wouldn’t budge. Then a girl came in and turned her around. After a few clicks people stopped walking in between, and I got this shot. 

Aside from the final photo, what I liked more about this photo was how she got to pose and what was happening right next to her. After years into photography, the most important thing I learned is that the story behind the photo is what makes it meaningful.

March 23, 2014 | San Jose, Tarlac